Symptoms of Problems in Typical Vermont Homes

From the outside, a home may seem like it is in great condition…well maintained, newer roof, updated windows. But on the inside, there may be a number of issues that compromise the energy efficiency of the home. Whether the house is a 150-year-old Victorian or a 15-year-old cape, there are probably many opportunities for energy improvements. We can work with you to learn about how your home performs and help us identify the opportunities for efficiency measures.

Take a look in your basement and your attic. Think about how hot your upstairs feels in the summer, or how drafty your kitchen may feel on a windy day in January. The gallery below illustrates symptoms you may see in your home.

  • spider webs are a sign of air flow

    Spider webs are a sign of air flow. Sealing cracks and leaks will make your basement less attractive to spiders!

  • fiberglass insulation acts as a filter when air is drawn through it

    This insulation is dirty, not moldy. Fiberglass insulation acts as a filter when air is drawn through it, and the dirt is left behind. Air-sealing prevents air from moving through the insulation.

  • attics often have lots of penetrations for electrical wires and plumbing that leak air from the warm house

    Attics often have lots of penetrations for electrical wires and plumbing that leak air from the warm house. This attic also has uneven and inadequate insulation.

  • basement foundation with a combination of construction materials

    Vermont basements often have foundations with a combination of construction materials, like this one with a stone bottom and poured concrete top. Air leaks around the stones, windows and the top of the wall where the concrete meets the wood.

  • attic hatch

    This is a typical Vermont attic hatch: uninsulated and no seal around the opening. Air gets in around the hatch and escapes through the roof.

  • moisture problems in the rafters

    Moisture problems in the rafters are caused by inadequate air-sealing.

  • storing wood in the basement is not recommended

    Storing wood in the basement is not recommended because the moisture from the drying wood gets into your walls and ceilings, causing moisture problems.

  • thick icicles create an ice dam

    Thick icicles create an ice dam which can lead to water damage inside your home. Icicles like this are the result of warm air from the home leaking into the roof structure.

  • this pattern of snow melting roof on a sunny day in Vermont demonstrates how warm air from inside the house is escaping through the roof

    This pattern of snow melting roof on a sunny day in Vermont demonstrates how warm air from inside the house is escaping through the roof. A uniform blanket of snow on a roof is an indicator of a tight, insulated home.